Posts Tagged ‘Silicon Valley’

A Marketing Genius, or just a Genius? Tim Ferriss

Tim Ferriss is the author of the 4-Hour Workweek and of the new 4-Hour Body.

Check out this short trailer:

Selected points from the 4-Hour Workweek:

 

The commonsense rules of the “real world” are a fragile collection of socially reinforced illusions.

I won’t ask you to choose between enjoyment today or money later. I believe you can both now. The goal is fun and profit.

Free time and automate it.

Inactivity is not the goal. Doing that which excites you is.

Focus on being productive instead of busy.

Nine to five for your working lifetime of 40-50 years is a long ass time if the rescue doesn’t come.

Fishing is best where the fewest go, and the collective insecurity of the world makes it easy for people to hit home runs while everyone is aiming for base hits.

How do your decisions change if retirement isn’t an option?

One doesn’t accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity.

What you do is infinitely more important than how you do it. Efficiency is still important, but it is useless unless applied to the right things.

The key to not being rushed is remembering that lack of time is actually lack of priorities.

Slowing down doesn’t mean accomplishing less; it means cutting out counterproductive distractions and the perception of being rushed.

Fat-free performance and time freedom begins with limiting intake overload.

If you prioritize properly, there is no need to multitask. Do not multi-task.

Profit is only profitable to the extent that you can use it. For that you need time.

Am I being productive or just active?

If I can do it better than an assistant, why should I pay them at all? Because the goal is to free your time to focuse on bigger and better things.

Never automate somthing that can be eliminated, and never delegate something that can be automated or streamlined.

Substracting the bad does no create the good. It leaves a vacuum . Decreasing income – driven work isn’t the end goal. Living more – and becoming more – is.

Learning to replace the perception of time famine with appreciation of time abundance is like going from tripe espresso to decaf.

Final Notes

In the book he gives specific strategies and techniques, to free time, become more productive and happy, automate your income, become more mobile and have a great lifestyle even without a crazy income.
I have 20-pages worth of notes but I won’t bring them here, so, read the book.
“What can I do with my time to enjoy life and feel good about myself? I can’t offer a single answer that will fit all people , but, based on the dozens of fulfilled NR’s I’ve interviewed , there are two components that are fundamental: continual learning and service”

Tim Ferriss on Marketing his Book

Click Here to Watch, David Siteman Garland interviewing Tim Ferriss.

The interview is great, a few things I picked up:

Soft marketing beats Hard marketing

If you market to 100 and get 5 people to write about you / your product:

The Hard Marketing way: 95 people hate you. 5 more people you owe a favor to.

The Soft Marketing way: 5 people willingly wrote about you + you create great relationships.

Online chatter beats offline media

When people talk about something online  and it spreads like wild fire, then the offline media will have to get into it for obvious reasons.

Relationships beat sophisticated PR campaigns

Nothing comes close both productively and emotionally to personal relationships; Probably the most important step to marketing his book was going to conferences and events, and making connections with people, occasionally sending them a copy of his book if they were interested, if not, other business & pleasure ideas sparked up.

His ‘PR Campaign’ consisted of paying for hotels and events, and sending out copies in advance

By the way if you haven’t read The 4 Hour Workweek yet, then:

What are you waiting for?

Click here for more key points from the interview

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